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Emerg Infect Dis. 2014 Apr;20(4):573-80. doi: 10.3201/eid2004.131328.

Rotavirus surveillance in urban and rural areas of Niger, April 2010-March 2012.

Abstract

Knowledge of rotavirus epidemiology is necessary to make informed decisions about vaccine introduction and to evaluate vaccine impact. During April 2010-March 2012, rotavirus surveillance was conducted among 9,745 children <5 years of age in 14 hospitals/health centers in Niger, where rotavirus vaccine has not been introduced. Study participants had acute watery diarrhea and moderate to severe dehydration, and 20% of the children were enrolled in a nutrition program. Of the 9,745 children, 30.6% were rotavirus positive. Genotyping of a subset of positive samples showed a variety of genotypes during the first year, although G2P[4] predominated. G12 genotypes, including G12P[8], which has emerged as a predominant strain in western Africa, represented >80% of isolates during the second year. Hospitalization and death rates and severe dehydration among rotavirus case-patients did not differ during the 2 years. The emergence of G12P[8] warrants close attention to the characteristics of associated epidemics and possible prevention measures.

KEYWORDS:

Africa; Niger; developing countries; diarrheal diseases; gastroenteritis; genotyping; malnutrition; rotavirus; rotavirus strain G12P[8]; surveillance; viruses

PMID:
24655441
PMCID:
PMC3966376
DOI:
10.3201/eid2004.131328
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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