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Nanomedicine. 2014 Jul;10(5):879-88. doi: 10.1016/j.nano.2014.02.005. Epub 2014 Feb 22.

Nanopore film based enrichment and quantification of low abundance hepcidin from human bodily fluids.

Author information

1
Chinese Academy of Science Key Laboratory for Biological Effects of Nanomaterials and Nanosafety, National Center for Nanoscience and Technology of China, Beijing, China; Department of Nanomedicine, Houston Methodist Hospital Research Institute, Houston, TX, USA.
2
Chinese Academy of Science Key Laboratory for Biological Effects of Nanomaterials and Nanosafety, National Center for Nanoscience and Technology of China, Beijing, China; College of Pharmaceutical Science, Jilin University, Changchun, China.
3
Chinese Academy of Science Key Laboratory for Biological Effects of Nanomaterials and Nanosafety, National Center for Nanoscience and Technology of China, Beijing, China; The First Affiliated Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun, China.
4
Chinese Academy of Science Key Laboratory for Biological Effects of Nanomaterials and Nanosafety, National Center for Nanoscience and Technology of China, Beijing, China.
5
Department of Nanomedicine, Houston Methodist Hospital Research Institute, Houston, TX, USA.
6
Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing, China.
7
Bruker Daltonics Inc. Beijing Office, Beijing, China.
8
Queensland Institute of Medical Research, Royal Brisbane Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
9
Department of Nanomedicine, Houston Methodist Hospital Research Institute, Houston, TX, USA; Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, New York City, NY, USA.
10
Department of Nanomedicine, Houston Methodist Hospital Research Institute, Houston, TX, USA; Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, New York City, NY, USA. Electronic address: yhu@HoustonMethodist.org.
11
Chinese Academy of Science Key Laboratory for Biological Effects of Nanomaterials and Nanosafety, National Center for Nanoscience and Technology of China, Beijing, China. Electronic address: zhaoyuliang@ihep.ac.cn.

Abstract

Endogenous peptides that represent biological and pathological information of disease have attracted interest for diagnosis. However, the extraction of those low abundance peptides is still a challenge because of the complexity of human bodily fluids (HBF). Hepcidin, a peptide hormone, has been recognized as a biomarker for iron-related diseases. There is no rapid and reliable way to enrich them from HBF. Here we describe a peptide extraction approach based on nanoporous silica thin films to successfully detect hepcidin from HBF. Cooperative functions of nanopore to biomolecule, including capillary adsorption, size-exclusion and electrostatic interaction, were systematically investigated to immobilize the target peptide. To promote this new approach to clinical practices, we further applied it to successfully assay the hepcidin levels in HBF provided by healthy volunteers and patients suffering from inflammation. Our finding provides a high-throughput, rapid, label-free and cost-effective detection method for capturing and quantifying low abundance peptides from HBF.

FROM THE CLINICAL EDITOR:

Diagnosing diseases with low concentration peptide biomarkers remains challenging. This team of authors describes a peptide extraction approach based on nanoporous silica thin films to successfully detect low concentrations of hepcidin from human body fluids collected from 119 healthy volunteers and 19 inflammation patients.

KEYWORDS:

Biomarker discovery; Hepcidin; MALDI-TOF MS; Nanoporous silica film; Peptide

PMID:
24566273
PMCID:
PMC4077980
DOI:
10.1016/j.nano.2014.02.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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