Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Phys Ther. 2014 May;94(5):632-43. doi: 10.2522/ptj.20130240. Epub 2014 Feb 6.

Therapists' use of the Graded Repetitive Arm Supplementary Program (GRASP) intervention: a practice implementation survey study.

Author information

1
L.A. Connell, PhD, BSc(Hons)Physiotherapy, Clinical Practice Research Unit, School of Health, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, United Kingdom PR1 2HE.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Only a small percentage of research is ever successfully translated into practice. The Graded Repetitive Arm Supplementary Program (GRASP) is a stroke rehabilitation intervention that anecdotally has had rapid translation from research to clinical practice. This study was conducted to explore the characteristics of this practice implementation.

OBJECTIVES:

The aims of this study were: (1) to explore the extent of practice implementation of GRASP in the United Kingdom; (2) using an implementation framework, to explore UK therapists' opinions of implementing GRASP; and (3) if GRASP is found to be used in the United Kingdom, to investigate differences in opinions between therapists who are using GRASP in practice and those who are not.

DESIGN:

A cross-sectional study design was used.

METHODS:

Data were collected via an online questionnaire. Participants in this study were members of the College of Occupational Therapy Specialist Section Neurological Practice and the Association of Chartered Physiotherapists Interested in Neurology.

RESULTS:

Of the 274 therapists who responded to the survey, 61 (22.3%) had experience of using GRASP, 114 (41.6%) knew of GRASP but had never used it, and 99 (36.1%) had never heard of GRASP. Therapists displayed positive opinions toward the implementation of a manual with graded progressions of structured upper limb exercises for people after stroke. Opinions were different between therapists who had used GRASP and those who had not.

LIMITATIONS:

The findings of this study may be limited by response bias.

CONCLUSIONS:

GRASP is a relatively new stroke rehabilitation intervention that has made impressive translation into the knowledge and practice of UK therapists. Therapists' opinions would suggest that GRASP is both an acceptable and feasible intervention and has the potential to be implemented by a greater number of therapists in a range of settings.

PMID:
24505098
PMCID:
PMC4016677
DOI:
10.2522/ptj.20130240
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Silverchair Information Systems Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center