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Nanomedicine. 2014 Jan;10(1):15-7. doi: 10.1016/j.nano.2013.10.007. Epub 2013 Nov 4.

Nanoparticle-emitted light attenuates amyloid-β-induced superoxide and inflammation in astrocytes.

Author information

1
Department of Biological Engineering, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO.
2
Zymera, Inc., San Jose, CA.
3
Department of Biochemistry, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO.
4
Department of Biological Engineering, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO. Electronic address: LeeJam@missouri.edu.

Abstract

Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the sixth leading cause of age-related death with no effective intervention yet available. Our previous studies have demonstrated the potential efficacy of Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) in AD cell models by mitigating amyloid-β peptide (Aβ)-induced oxidative stress and inflammation. However, the penetration depth of light is still the major challenge for implementing LLLT in animal models and in the clinical settings. In this study, we present the potential of applying Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer to Quantum Dots (BRET-Qdots) as an alternative near infrared (NIR) light source for LLLT. Our results show that BRET-Qdot-emitted NIR suppresses Aβ-induced oxidative stress and inflammatory responses in primary rat astrocytes. These data provide a proof of concept for a nanomedicine platform for LLLT.

FROM THE CLINICAL EDITOR:

Low Level Laser Therapy has already been demonstrated to mitigate amyloid-β peptide induced oxidative stress and inflammation, a key driver of Alzheimer's disease. The major issue in moving this forward from cell cultures to live animals and potentially to human subjects is light penetration depth. In this novel study, BRET-Qdots were used as an alternative near infrared light source with good efficacy, paving the way to the development of a nanomedicine platform.

KEYWORDS:

Alzheimer’s disease; Inflammation; Light nanomedicine

PMID:
24200521
PMCID:
PMC3895489
DOI:
10.1016/j.nano.2013.10.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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