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Heart Lung Circ. 2014 Mar;23(3):e84-7. doi: 10.1016/j.hlc.2013.09.006. Epub 2013 Oct 9.

A twist in the transradial coronary catheterisation.

Author information

1
Department of Cardiology, The Northern Hospital, Victoria, Australia; Department of Medicine, University of Melbourne, Australia. Electronic address: hissper@me.com.
2
Department of Cardiology, St Vincent Hospital, Victoria, Australia.
3
Department of Cardiology, The Northern Hospital, Victoria, Australia; Department of Medicine, University of Melbourne, Australia.
4
Department of Medicine, University of Melbourne, Australia; Department of Cardiology, St Vincent Hospital, Victoria, Australia.
5
Department of Cardiology, The Northern Hospital, Victoria, Australia; Department of Medicine, University of Melbourne, Australia; Department of Cardiology, St Vincent Hospital, Victoria, Australia.

Abstract

The transradial approach for coronary angiography was first described in 1989. With the advent of modern equipment and improved technology it has recently gained significant interest amongst interventional cardiologists. As compared to femoral access, the radial approach has the major advantages of lower access site complication rates, cost-effectiveness, and shorter hospital stays. Further clinical benefits of lower morbidity and cardiac mortality in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction have been shown recently. Rare vascular complications may include radial artery spasm, dissection, occlusion, perforation or compartment syndrome. Here, we present two unusual cases of an entrapped catheter in the radial artery and their outcomes.

KEYWORDS:

Acute coronary syndrome; Coronary angiography; Entrapment; Myocardial infarction; Transradial catheterisation

PMID:
24176486
DOI:
10.1016/j.hlc.2013.09.006
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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