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Psychopharmacology (Berl). 2014 Jan;231(1):123-33. doi: 10.1007/s00213-013-3215-5. Epub 2013 Jul 31.

Developmental fluoxetine exposure facilitates sexual behavior in female offspring.

Author information

1
School for Mental Health and Neuroscience, Department of Neuroscience, Faculty of Health, Medicine and Life Sciences, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands.

Abstract

RATIONALE:

A growing number of infants are being exposed to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) medications during the perinatal period. SSRIs target the serotoninergic system and are a popular treatment for maternal mood disorders. Serotonin itself plays a key role in the sexual differentiation through its role in the development of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, and previous research has shown that developmental SSRI exposure has an effect on sexual behavior in male offspring.

OBJECTIVES:

Our aim was to determine the role of developmental exposure to a popular SSRI medication, fluoxetine, on sexual differentiation of the brain and behavior in female offspring using a rodent model of maternal adversity.

METHODS:

Stressed and non-stressed Sprague-Dawley rat dams were chronically treated with either fluoxetine (5 mg/kg/day) or vehicle beginning on postnatal day 1. Four groups of female offspring were used: (1) control + vehicle, (2) control + fluoxetine, (3) prenatal stress + vehicle, and (4) prenatal stress + fluoxetine.

RESULTS:

Primary results show that in adult female offspring, developmental fluoxetine exposure facilitates proceptive and receptive behaviors with a significant increase in the number of proceptive behaviors, a significant increase in the lordosis quotient, and a significant decrease in the rejection quotient.

CONCLUSIONS:

This research contributes in the understanding of the long-term impact developmental fluoxetine exposure on the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) system in adult female offspring.

PMID:
23900642
DOI:
10.1007/s00213-013-3215-5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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