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Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2013 Mar 19;110(12):4834-9. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1300436110. Epub 2013 Feb 4.

Gibberellins accumulate in the elongating endodermal cells of Arabidopsis root.

Author information

1
Section of Cell and Developmental Biology, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA.

Abstract

Plant hormones are small-molecule signaling compounds that are collectively involved in all aspects of plant growth and development. Unlike animals, plants actively regulate the spatial distribution of several of their hormones. For example, auxin transport results in the formation of auxin maxima that have a key role in developmental patterning. However, the spatial distribution of the other plant hormones, including gibberellic acid (GA), is largely unknown. To address this, we generated two bioactive fluorescent GA compounds and studied their distribution in Arabidopsis thaliana roots. The labeled GAs specifically accumulated in the endodermal cells of the root elongation zone. Pharmacological studies, along with examination of mutants affected in endodermal specification, indicate that GA accumulation is an active and highly regulated process. Our results strongly suggest the presence of an active GA transport mechanism that would represent an additional level of GA regulation.

PMID:
23382232
PMCID:
PMC3606980
DOI:
10.1073/pnas.1300436110
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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