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Transl Stroke Res. 2012 Dec;3(4):491-9. doi: 10.1007/s12975-012-0208-3. Epub 2012 Sep 4.

Human umbilical cord blood cells alter blood and spleen cell populations after stroke.

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1
Center for Excellence in Aging and Brain Repair, Morsani College of Medicine, University of South Florida 12901 Bruce B. Downs Blvd, MDC78, Tampa, FL 33612 ; Department of Molecular Pharmacology and Physiology, Morsani College of Medicine, University of South Florida 12901 Bruce B. Downs Blvd, MDC78, Tampa, FL 33612.

Abstract

The human umbilical cord blood (HUCB) mononuclear cell (MNC) fraction is a mixed population of cells that induces functional repair in rodent models of stroke when injected intravenously (i.v.). The transplanted cells are found in the infarcted hemisphere and the spleen. The goal of this project was to determine the nature of the interaction between the HUCB MNCs cells and splenic immune cells. Male Sprague Dawley rats underwent permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and received i.v. injection of either vehicle (MCAO only), HUCB MNCs or MNCs depleted of CD14+ monocytes, CD133+ stem cells or CD19+ B cells 48 hours post-stroke. At 72 hours post-MCAO, the animals were euthanized and the spleens and blood MNCs harvested for flow cytometry and mitogen proliferation assays. All HUCB cell preparations decreased the percentage of T cells in the spleen and monocytes in the blood (p < 0.05). MNCs depleted of CD14+ and CD19+ decreased the percentage of macrophage (p < 0.001), while CD133 depleted MNCs increased the percentage of macrophage in spleen (p < 0.001); MNC did not alter the macrophage population from the level observed after MCAO. Only HUCB MNC significantly decreased Concanavalin A (ConA)-induced T cell stimulation (p < 0.05). These results suggest that the effects of HUCB MNC in the spleen are not due to a single HUCB population, but the interaction of all the subpopulations together.

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