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Clin Sci (Lond). 2013 Apr;124(8):543-52. doi: 10.1042/CS20120251.

Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition curbs tyrosine nitration of mitochondrial proteins in the renal cortex during the early stage of diabetes mellitus in rats.

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1
Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences, Kitasato University School of Allied Health Sciences, Kanagawa 252-0373, Japan.

Abstract

Experiments were performed to evaluate the hypothesis that ACE (angiotensin-converting enzyme) inhibition (enalapril) suppresses 3-NT (3-nitrotyrosine) production in the renal cortex during the early stage of Type 1 DM (diabetes mellitus) in the rat. Enalapril was administered chronically for 2 weeks to subsets of STZ (streptozotocin)-induced DM and vehicle-treated sham rats. O(2)(-) (superoxide anion) and NO(x) (nitrate+nitrite) levels were measured in the media bathing renal cortical slices after 90 min incubation in vitro. SOD (superoxide dismutase) activity and 3-NT content were measured in the renal cortex homogenate. Renal cortical nitrated protein was identified by proteomic analysis. Renal cortical production of O(2)(-) and 3-NT was increased in DM rats; however, enalapril suppressed these changes. DM rats also exhibited elevated renal cortical NO(x) production and SOD activity, and these changes were magnified by enalapril treatment. 2-DE (two-dimensional gel electrophoresis)-based Western blotting revealed more than 20 spots with positive 3-NT immunoreactivity in the renal cortex of DM rats. Enalapril treatment blunted the DM-induced increase in tyrosine nitration of three proteins ACO2, GDH1 and MMSDH (aconitase 2, glutamate dehydrogenase 1 and methylmalonate-semialdehyde dehydrogenase), each of which resides in mitochondria. These data are consistent with enalapril preventing DM-induced tyrosine nitration of mitochondrial proteins by a mechanism involving suppression of oxidant production and enhancement of antioxidant capacity, including SOD activation.

PMID:
23130652
PMCID:
PMC3540783
DOI:
10.1042/CS20120251
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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