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J Pediatr Adolesc Gynecol. 2012 Dec;25(6):367-70. doi: 10.1016/j.jpag.2012.06.008. Epub 2012 Oct 22.

Factors contributing to initial weight loss among adolescents with polycystic ovary syndrome.

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  • 1Division of Pediatric Endocrinology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI 53792, USA.

Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate the impact of a multidisciplinary clinic on weight management among adolescents with PCOS.

DESIGN:

140 adolescent females were evaluated in a multidisciplinary PCOS clinic from March 2005 to December 2008. The team included a pediatric endocrinologist, health psychologist, dietitian, and pediatric gynecologist. 110 were diagnosed with PCOS based on the Rotterdam Criteria. Height, weight, BMI, number of subspecialists seen, use of metformin, and compliance with return visits were obtained from medical records.

SETTING:

American Family Children's Hospital in Madison, Wisconsin.

PARTICIPANTS:

110 adolescent females with polycystic ovary syndrome.

INTERVENTIONS:

Consultation with a dietitian and health psychologist.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE:

Change in weight.

RESULTS:

The average age at first visit was 15.9 years. The average BMI was 34.7 kg/m(2) (range 18.1-55.5). Seventy-six percent had an initial BMI above the 95(th) percentile. Interactions with providers at the initial visit included a pediatric endocrinologist (100%), health psychologist (60.9%), dietitian (75.5%) and gynecologist (70.9%). Seventy one percent returned for a follow-up visit, (average time of 4.5 months between visits) with 57% achieving weight loss (average 3.5 kg) and an additional 12.6% demonstrating no significant weight gain (< 1.5 kg). Thus, 69.6% demonstrated weight loss/stabilization.

CONCLUSIONS:

In this multidisciplinary clinic for adolescents with PCOS, nearly 70% of patients succeeded in short-term weight stabilization, with 57% demonstrating weight loss. Interactions with the health psychologist and dietitian appeared to play a key role in successful weight control, supporting the importance of psychology and nutrition expertise in the management of this disorder.

PMID:
23089571
DOI:
10.1016/j.jpag.2012.06.008
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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