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J Public Health Dent. 2014 Winter;74(1):42-9. doi: 10.1111/j.1752-7325.2012.00365.x. Epub 2012 Sep 13.

Proportion and extent of manifestation of molar-incisor-hypomineralizations according to different phenotypes.

Author information

1
Department of Conservative Dentistry and Periodontology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Munich, Germany Helmholtz Zentrum of Munich, German Research Centre for Environmental Health, Institute of Epidemiology, Neuherberg, Germany Institute of Medical Data Management, Biometrics and Epidemiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Munich, Germany Department of Paediatrics, Technical University of Munich, Munich, Germany Department of Preventive and Paediatric Dentistry, Friedrich-Schiller-University of Jena, Jena, Germany Department of Paediatrics, Marien-Hospital Wesel, Wesel, Germany Dr. von Haunersches Kinderspital, Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Munich, Germany Bioscience Research Center, College of Dentistry, University of Tennessee, Memphis, TN, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This epidemiological study aimed to assess the proportion and extent of manifestation of enamel hypomineralization, including molar-incisor-hypomineralization (MIH), in the permanent and primary dentition.

METHODS:

A total of 693 children enrolled in an ongoing birth cohort study (GINIplus-10) were examined at their 10-year follow-up. Enamel hypomineralization was scored in the primary and permanent dentition on a tooth- and surface-related level based on the criteria of the European Academy of Paediatric Dentistry (EAPD). Children were grouped according to their distribution pattern of enamel hypomineralization: children with a minimum of one hypomineralized tooth in the primary dentition (ht ≥ 1) and permanent dentition (HT ≥ 1); with a minimum of one hypomineralization on at least one first permanent molar (MIH); and with hypomineralization on at least one first permanent molar and permanent incisor (M + IH). For each group, the mean values of hypomineralized primary teeth (ht), permanent teeth (HT), and permanent surfaces (HS) were calculated.

RESULTS:

The proportion of affected children was 36.5 percent (HT ≥ 1), 14.7 percent (MIH), and 9.4 percent (M + IH); 6.9 percent of the subjects had a minimum of one affected primary tooth (ht ≥ 1). The mean number of hypomineralized permanent teeth and surfaces were 2.3HT/2.9HS (HT ≥ 1), 3.4HT/4.8HS (MIH), and 4.2HT/5.9HS (M + IH). The mean number of hypomineralized primary teeth amounted to 0.1ht in the entire study population.

CONCLUSIONS:

Enamel hypomineralization can be detected frequently in this study sample. Children with M + IH showed the highest number of affected teeth and surfaces followed by those with MIH.

KEYWORDS:

dental enamel; epidemiology; molar incisor hypomineralization; proportion; tooth hypomineralization

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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