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Med J Aust. 2012 Jun 18;196(11):693-5.

Effect of false-positive screening mammograms on rescreening in Western Australia.

Author information

1
Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences, University of Western Australia, Perth, WA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To quantify the effect of previous false-positive mammogram results on rescreening rates in a population of women participating in the BreastScreen WA (BSWA) program.

DESIGN AND PARTICIPANTS:

Retrospective cohort study of women aged 50-69 years who received free screening mammograms at BSWA between 1 January 1995 and 31 December 2007.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Percentages of women attending rescreening, and risk ratios for rescreening.

RESULTS:

A total of 22 396 screening mammograms were falsely reported as positive, and 560 333 mammogram screens were reported as normal (negative). Women with a false-positive index mammogram result were less likely than women with a true-negative index mammogram result to attend rescreening at 27 months (67.6% v 70.7%; risk ratio, 0.96; P < 0.001). A reduced rescreening rate was seen in all subgroups of women except Indigenous women. Rescreening rates were affected by the types of assessment done at the recall visit.

CONCLUSION:

Mammographic population screening services should keep their false-positive result rates low, to prevent women from being deterred from screening.

PMID:
22708767
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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