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Can J Cardiol. 2012 May;28(3):262-9. doi: 10.1016/j.cjca.2011.11.008. Epub 2012 Jan 30.

A framework for discussion on how to improve prevention, management, and control of hypertension in Canada.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, Libin Cardiovascular Institute of Alberta, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. ncampbel@ucalgary.ca

Abstract

Increased blood pressure is a leading risk for premature death and disability. The causes of increased blood pressure are intuitive and well known. However, the fundamental basis and means for improving blood pressure control are highly integrated into our complex societal structure both inside and outside our health system and hence require a comprehensive discussion of the pathway forward. A group of Canadian experts was appointed by Hypertension Canada with funding from Public Health Agency of Canada and the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada, Canadian Institute for Health Research (HSFC-CIHR) Chair in Hypertension Prevention and Control to draft a discussion Framework for prevention and control of hypertension. The report includes an environmental scan of past and current activities, proposals for key indicators, and targets to be achieved by 2020, and what changes are likely to be required in Canada to achieve the proposed targets. The key targets are to reduce the prevalence of hypertension to 13% of adults and improve control to 78% of those with hypertension. Broad changes in government policy, research, and health services delivery are required for these changes to occur. The Hypertension Framework process is designed to have 3 phases. The first includes the experts' report which is summarized in this report. The second phase is to gather input and priorities for action from individuals and organizations for revision of the Framework. It is hoped the Framework will stimulate discussion and input for its full intended lifespan 2011-2020. The third phase is to work with individuals and organizations on the priorities set in phase 2.

PMID:
22284588
DOI:
10.1016/j.cjca.2011.11.008
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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