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Lasers Surg Med. 2012 Mar;44(3):218-26. doi: 10.1002/lsm.22003. Epub 2012 Jan 24.

Low-level laser therapy for closed-head traumatic brain injury in mice: effect of different wavelengths.

Author information

1
Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES:

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) affects millions worldwide and is without effective treatment. One area that is attracting growing interest is the use of transcranial low-level laser therapy (LLLT) to treat TBI. The fact that near-infrared light can penetrate into the brain would allow non-invasive treatment to be carried out with a low likelihood of treatment-related adverse events. LLLT may treat TBI by increasing respiration in the mitochondria, causing activation of transcription factors, reducing inflammatory mediators and oxidative stress, and inhibiting apoptosis.

STUDY DESIGN/MATERIALS AND METHODS:

We tested LLLT in a mouse model of closed-head TBI produced by a controlled weight drop onto the skull. Mice received a single treatment with continuous-wave 665, 730, 810, or 980 nm lasers (36 J/cm(2) delivered at 150 mW/cm(2)) 4-hour post-TBI and were followed up by neurological performance testing for 4 weeks.

RESULTS:

Mice with moderate-to-severe TBI treated with 665 and 810 nm laser (but not with 730 or 980 nm) had a significant improvement in Neurological Severity Score that increased over the course of the follow-up compared to sham-treated controls. Morphometry of brain sections showed a reduction in small deficits in 665 and 810 nm laser treated mouse brains at 28 days.

CONCLUSIONS:

The effectiveness of 810 nm agrees with previous publications, and together with the effectiveness of 660 nm and non-effectiveness of 730 and 980 nm can be explained by the absorption spectrum of cytochrome oxidase, the candidate mitochondrial chromophore in transcranial LLLT.

PMID:
22275301
PMCID:
PMC3397203
DOI:
10.1002/lsm.22003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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