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Age (Dordr). 2012 Aug;34(4):783-94. doi: 10.1007/s11357-011-9276-7. Epub 2011 Jun 22.

Copper ability to induce premature senescence in human fibroblasts.

Author information

1
Faculty of Nutrition and Food Sciences, University of Porto, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, Oporto, Portugal. lmatos@fcna.up.pt

Abstract

Human diploid fibroblasts (HDFs) exposed to subcytotoxic concentrations of oxidative or stressful agents, such as hydrogen peroxide, tert-butylhydroperoxide, or ethanol, undergo stress-induced premature senescence (SIPS). This condition is characterized by the appearance of replicative senescence biomarkers such as irreversible growth arrest, increase in senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA β-gal) activity, altered cell morphology, and overexpression of several senescence-associated genes. Copper is an essential trace element known to accumulate with ageing and to be involved in the pathogenesis of some age-related disorders. Past studies using either yeast or human cellular models of ageing provided evidence in favor of the role of intracellular copper as a longevity modulator. In the present study, copper ability to cause the appearance of senescent features in HDFs was assessed. WI-38 fibroblasts exposed to a subcytotoxic concentration of copper sulfate presented inhibition of cell proliferation, cell enlargement, increased SA β-gal activity, and mRNA overexpression of several senescence-associated genes such as p21, apolipoprotein J (ApoJ), fibronectin, transforming growth factor β-1 (TGF β1), insulin growth factor binding protein 3, and heme oxygenase 1. Western blotting results confirmed enhanced intracellular p21, ApoJ, and TGF β1 in copper-treated cells. Thus, similar to other SIPS-inducing agents, HDF exposure to subcytotoxic concentration of copper results in premature senescence. Further studies will unravel molecular mechanisms and the biological meaning of copper-associated senescence and lead to a better understanding of copper-related disorder establishment and progression.

PMID:
21695420
PMCID:
PMC3682071
DOI:
10.1007/s11357-011-9276-7
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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