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Biochem Biophys Res Commun. 2011 Jun 17;409(4):591-5. doi: 10.1016/j.bbrc.2011.04.028. Epub 2011 Apr 12.

The dynamic equilibrium between ATP synthesis and ATP consumption is lower in isolated mitochondria from myotubes established from type 2 diabetic subjects compared to lean control.

Author information

1
Laboratory of Molecular Physiology, Dept. of Pathology, Odense University Hospital, Denmark.

Abstract

Although, most studies of human skeletal muscle in vivo have reported the co-existence of impaired insulin sensitivity and reduced expression of oxidative phosphorylation genes, there is so far no clear evidence for whether the intrinsic ATP synthesis is primarily decreased or not in the mitochondria of diabetic skeletal muscle from subjects with type 2 diabetes. ATP synthesis was measured on mitochondria isolated from cultured myotubes established from lean (11/9), obese (9/11) and subjects with type 2 diabetes (9/11) (female/male, n=20 in each group), precultured under normophysiological conditions in order to verify intrinsic impairments. To resemble dynamic equilibrium present in whole cells between ATP synthesis and utilization, ATP was measured in the presence of an ATP consuming enzyme, hexokinase, under steady state. Mitochondria were isolated using an affinity based method which selects the mitochondria based on an antibody recognizing the mitochondrial outer membrane and not by size through gradient centrifugation. The dynamic equilibrium between ATP synthesis and ATP consumption is 35% lower in isolated mitochondria from myotubes established from type 2 diabetic subjects compared to lean control. The ATP synthesis rate without ATP consumption was not different between groups and there were no significant gender differences. The mitochondrial dysfunction in type 2 diabetes in vivo is partly based on a primarily impaired ATP synthesis.

PMID:
21513703
DOI:
10.1016/j.bbrc.2011.04.028
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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