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Acupunct Med. 2011 Jun;29(2):116-21. doi: 10.1136/aim.2010.002741. Epub 2011 Mar 13.

Is there a difference between the effects of single and triple indirect moxibustion stimulations on skin temperature changes of the posterior trunk surface?

Author information

1
Course of Acupuncture and Moxibustion, Department of Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, Tsukuba University of Technology, Tsukuba, Japan.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To determine whether any difference exists in responses to indirect moxibustion (IM) relative to thermal stimulation duration.

METHODS:

In experiment 1, 9 subjects attended two experimental sessions consisting of single stimulation with IM or triple stimulation with IM, using a crossover design. A K-type thermocouple temperature probe was fixed on the skin surface at the GV14 acupuncture point. IM stimulation was administered to the top of the probe in order to measure the temperature curve. In addition, each subject evaluated his or her subjective feeling of heat on a visual analogue scale after each stimulation. Experiment 2 was conducted on 42 participants, divided into three groups according to the envelope allocation method: single stimulation with IM (n=20), triple stimulation with IM (n=11) and a control group (n=11). A thermograph was used to obtain the skin temperature on the posterior trunk of the participant. To analyse skin temperature, four arbitrary frames (the scapular, interscapular, lumbar and vertebral regions) were made on the posterior trunk.

RESULT:

In experiment 1, no significant difference in maximum temperature was found in IM and subjective feeling of heat intensity between single and triple stimulation with IM. In experiment 2, increases in skin temperature occurred on the posterior trunk, but no differences in skin temperature occurred between the groups receiving single and triple stimulation with IM.

CONCLUSION:

No difference exists in the skin temperature response to moxibustion between the single and triple stimulation with IM.

PMID:
21402559
DOI:
10.1136/aim.2010.002741
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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