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Lipids Health Dis. 2015 Dec 30;14:167. doi: 10.1186/s12944-015-0169-0.

Lipids, blood pressure and kidney update 2015.

Author information

1
Department of Hypertension, Chair of Nephrology and Hypertension, Medical University of Lodz, Zeromskiego 113, 90-549, Lodz, Poland. maciejbanach@aol.co.uk.
2
Department of Medicine, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY, USA.
3
Department of Epidemiology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA.
4
Department of Functional Sciences, Discipline of Pathophysiology, "Victor Babes" University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Timisoara, Romania.
5
Department of Hypertension, Chair of Nephrology and Hypertension, Medical University of Lodz, Zeromskiego 113, 90-549, Lodz, Poland.
6
Nephrology Clinic, Dialysis and Renal Transplant Center, C.I. Parhon University Hospital and Grigore. T. Popa, University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Iasi, Romania.

Abstract

The most important studies and guidelines in the topics of lipid, blood pressure and kidney published in 2015 were reviewed. In lipid research, the IMProved Reduction of Outcomes: Vytorin Efficacy International Trial (IMPROVE-IT) trial revalidated the concept "lower is better" for low density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol as a target for therapy, increasing the necessity of treatment the high-risk patients to achieve LDL-C goals. After these results, ezetimibe might become the preferred additional drug in the combination therapy of lipid disorders because of oral dosage form and lower acquisition cost. However, for the statin-intolerant patients and those patients requiring essential reductions in LDL-C to achieve their goals, new therapies, including PCSK9 inhibitors remain promising drugs. In blood pressure research, American Heart Association (AHA)/American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2015 guidelines recommended a target for blood pressure below 140/90 mmHg in stable or unstable coronary artery disease patients and below 150/90 mmHg in patients older than 80 years of age, however the recent results of the Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial (SPRINT) trial have suggested that there might be significant benefits, taking into account cardiovascular risk, for hypertensive patients over 50 without diabetes and blood pressure levels <120/80. In kidney research, reducing the progression of chronic kidney disease and related complications such as anemia, metabolic acidosis, bone and mineral diseases, acute kidney injury and cardiovascular disease is still a goal for clinicians.

PMID:
26718096
PMCID:
PMC4696333
DOI:
10.1186/s12944-015-0169-0
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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