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Zhonghua Yi Xue Za Zhi. 2014 May 27;94(20):1570-2.

[Intensive care unit survey of cognition status of donation after brain death].

[Article in Chinese]

Author information

1
Department of Critical Medicine, First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510700, China.
2
Department of Organ Transplantation, First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510700, China. Email: gdtrc@163.com.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To explore the development approach of donation after brain death through analyzing the cognition status of donation after brain death among medical staff and potential donor (PD) family members of intensive care unit (ICU).

METHODS:

Analysis was conducted for the cognition of donation after brain death among 149 ICU professionals and 879 PD family members at 89 hospitals from July 2011 to April 2013.

RESULTS:

Medical staff: 100% (149/149) recognized the significance of donation after brain death, 96.6% (144/149) approved of donation after brain death, 85.9% (128/149) knew about brain death criteria, 94.0% (140/149) accepted the equivalence of brain death as death. Awareness of standard of potential donor: 13.4% (20/149) were aware of donation age, 40.9% (61/149) familiar with the donation criteria of liver and kidney function and 44.3% (66/149) knew the hepatitis B donation criteria. Necessity of brain death legislation: 79.2% (118/149) considered it necessary, 14.8% (22/149) unimportant and 6.0% (9/149) not necessary. How to manage donation after brain death: 43.6% (65/149) did not know how, 79.2% (118/149) were afraid and 30.9% (46/149) never considered. Family members: 0/879 knew about brain death, 98.6% (867/879) accepted the equivalence of brain death as death, 99.5% (875/879) approved the significance of donation after brain death and 47.0% (413/879) agreed with donation after brain death. The reasons for approving the significance of donation after brain death but not agreeing with donation: 80.5% (372/462) required a full corpse after death and 19.5% (90/462) for other reasons. Reasons for agreeing with donation but refuse: 50.1% (207/413) were opposed by other family members, 11.4% (47/413) beware of neighbors' chat about their organ trading, 9.2% (38/413) hoped to be paid and 8.0% (33/413) for the others.

CONCLUSIONS:

The cognitive deficits of donation after brain death for medical staff and family members, medical staff's worries about brain death legislation and traditional thoughts of family members are the main reasons for a low conversion rate of PD. A professional transplant coordinating team should be built for national organ donation knowledge education.

PMID:
25146747
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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