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Int J Oral Maxillofac Implants. 2009;24 Suppl:92-109.

Computer technology applications in surgical implant dentistry: a systematic review.

Author information

1
Clinic od Fixed and Removable Prosthodontics, Center for Dental and Oral Medicine and Cranio-Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Zurich, Plattenstrasse 11, CH-8032 Zurich, Switzerland. ronald.jung@zzmk.uzh.ch

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To assess the literature on accuracy and clinical performance of computer technology applications in surgical implant dentistry.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Electronic and manual literature searches were conducted to collect information about (1) the accuracy and (2) clinical performance of computer-assisted implant systems. Meta-regression analysis was performed for summarizing the accuracy studies. Failure/complication rates were analyzed using random-effects Poisson regression models to obtain summary estimates of 12-month proportions.

RESULTS:

Twenty-nine different image guidance systems were included. From 2,827 articles, 13 clinical and 19 accuracy studies were included in this systematic review. The meta-analysis of the accuracy (19 clinical and preclinical studies) revealed a total mean error of 0.74 mm (maximum of 4.5 mm) at the entry point in the bone and 0.85 mm at the apex (maximum of 7.1 mm). For the 5 included clinical studies (total of 506 implants) using computer-assisted implant dentistry, the mean failure rate was 3.36% (0% to 8.45%) after an observation period of at least 12 months. In 4.6% of the treated cases, intraoperative complications were reported; these included limited interocclusal distances to perform guided implant placement, limited primary implant stability, or need for additional grafting procedures.

CONCLUSION:

Differing levels and quantity of evidence were available for computer-assisted implant placement, revealing high implant survival rates after only 12 months of observation in different indications and a reasonable level of accuracy. However, future long-term clinical data are necessary to identify clinical indications and to justify additional radiation doses, effort, and costs associated with computer-assisted implant surgery.

PMID:
19885437
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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