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S Afr Med J. 2009 May;99(5):326-30.

Associations between body mass index and serum levels of C-reactive protein.

Author information

1
Department of Famnily and Community Medicine, Tri-Service General Hospital; School of Medicine, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Obesity leads to increased risk of cardiovascular disease and glucose intolerance, which are phenomena of chronic inflammation. This study was performed to determine whether a higher body mass index (BMI) and central obesity are associated with low-grade inflammation.

METHODS:

An analysis of 8 453 adults aged > or =20 years was performed. Every subject completed a household interview and a questionnaire regarding personal health, and their BMI and serum C-reactive protein (CRP) level were measured. The BMI data were divided into quintiles, using multiple linear regression to estimate the relationship between CRP level and BMI quintiles. An extended-model approach was used for covariate adjustment. The association between central obesity and CRP level was examined by this method as well.

RESULTS:

After controlling for demographics, chronic diseases, health behaviours and levels of folate and vitamin B12, the beta coefficient (which represents the change of natural-log-transformed levels of CRP for each kg/m2 increase in BMI) was 0.078 (p < 0.001). The CRP levels also increased across increasing quintiles of BMI (p for trend <0.001). The beta coefficient, representing the change of natural-log-transformed levels of CRP comparing subjects with central obesity to those without, was 0.876 (p < 0.001).

CONCLUSION:

Higher BMIs as well as central obesity are independently associated with higher levels of CRP.

PMID:
19588793
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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