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Can J Cardiol. 2009 May;25(5):271-7.

2009 Canadian Hypertension Education Program recommendations: the scientific summary--an annual update.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada. ncampbel@ucalgary.ca

Abstract

The present report highlights the key messages of the 2009 Canadian Hypertension Education Program (CHEP) recommendations for the management of hypertension and the supporting clinical evidence. In 2009, the CHEP emphasizes the need to improve the control of hypertension in people with diabetes. Intensive reduction in blood pressure (to less than 130/80 mmHg) in people with diabetes leads to significant reductions in mortality rates, disability rates and overall health care system costs, and may lead to improved quality of life. The CHEP recommendations continue to emphasize the important role of patient self-efficacy by promoting lifestyle changes to prevent and control hypertension, and encouraging home measurement of blood pressure. Unfortunately, most Canadians make only minor changes in lifestyle after a diagnosis of hypertension. Routine blood pressure measurement at all appropriate visits, and screening for and management of all cardiovascular risks are key to blood pressure management. Many young hypertensive Canadians with multiple cardiovascular risks are not treated with antihypertensive drugs. This is despite the evidence that individuals with multiple cardiovascular risks and hypertension should be strongly considered for antihypertensive drug therapy regardless of age. In 2009, the CHEP specifically recommends not to combine an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor with an angiotensin receptor blocker in people with uncomplicated hypertension, diabetes (without micro- or macroalbuminuria), chronic kidney disease (without nephropathy [micro- or overt proteinuria]) or ischemic heart disease (without heart failure).

PMID:
19417857
PMCID:
PMC2707168
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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