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Infect Immun. 2008 Aug;76(8):3717-24. doi: 10.1128/IAI.00311-08. Epub 2008 May 19.

The absence of Toll-like receptor 4 signaling in C3H/HeJ mice predisposes them to overwhelming rickettsial infection and decreased protective Th1 responses.

Author information

1
Department of Pathology and Center for Biodefense and Emerging Infectious Diseases, University of Texas Medical Branch, 301 University Blvd., Galveston, TX 77555-0609, USA.

Abstract

The importance of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in immunity to rickettsiae remains elusive. To investigate the role of TLR4 in protection against rickettsioses, we utilized C3H/HeJ mice, which are naturally defective in TLR4 signaling, and compared the responses of C3H/HeN and C3H/HeJ mice following intravenous inoculation with Rickettsia conorii. Mice genetically defective in TLR4 signaling developed overwhelming, fatal rickettsial infections when given an inoculum that was nonfatal for TLR4-competent mice. In addition, mice lacking the ability to signal through TLR4 had significantly greater rickettsial burdens in vivo. Moreover, we observed greater concentrations of the cytokines interleukin 6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor alpha, IL-12p40, IL-12p70, and IL-17 in the sera of mice with intact TLR4 function as well as significantly greater quantities of activated CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes. Additionally, we also observed that Th17 cells were present only in TLR4-competent mice, suggesting an important role for TLR4 ligation in the activation of this subset. In agreement with these data, we also observed significantly greater percentages of immunosuppressive regulatory T cells in the spleen during infection in TLR4-defective mice. Together, these data demonstrate that, while rickettsiae do not contain endotoxic lipopolysaccharide, they nevertheless initiate TLR4-specific immune responses, and these responses are important in protection.

PMID:
18490467
PMCID:
PMC2493240
DOI:
10.1128/IAI.00311-08
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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