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Dis Colon Rectum. 2007 Aug;50(8):1119-27; discussion 1126-7.

The status of radical proctectomy and sphincter-sparing surgery in the United States.

Author information

1
Department of Surgery, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Worldwide, "centers of excellence" in rectal cancer surgery report high rates of anal sphincter-sparing surgery (70-90 percent) after proctectomy. The rate of sphincter-sparing surgery with reestablishment of intestinal continuity in the general population of the United Stares is unknown.

METHODS:

We used data from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample, a 20 percent stratified random sample of patients admitted to hospitals in the United States. We identified patients with rectal cancer from 1988 through 2003 who underwent sphincter-sparing surgery with reestablishment of intestinal continuity or proctectomy with colostomy. To determine predictors of sphincter-sparing surgery with reestablishment of intestinal continuity, we constructed a multivariate model that analyzed patients' age, gender, race, insurance status, and income level.

RESULTS:

During our 16-year study period, radical extirpative procedures were performed in 41,631 patients: 16,510 (39.7 percent) sphincter-sparing surgery with reestablishment of intestinal continuity, and 25,121 (60.3 percent) sphincter-sacrificing procedures. The proportion of sphincter-sparing procedures increased from 26.9 percent in 1988 to 48.3 percent in 2003 (P < 0.001). There has been no significant change in the rate of sphincter-sparing surgery since 1999 (P = not significant). Logistic regression revealed that patients who were older, male, black, used Medicaid insurance, or lived in lower-income zip codes were less likely to have sphincter-sparing surgery with reestablishment of intestinal continuity (P < 0.001).

CONCLUSIONS:

Despite a significant increase in the rate of sphincter-sparing surgery with reestablishment of intestinal continuity, most radical resections for rectal cancer in hospitals in the United States result in a colostomy. Patients vulnerable to proctectomy without sphincter preservation were older, male, black, used Medicaid insurance, or lived in lower income zip codes.

Comment in

PMID:
17573548
DOI:
10.1007/s10350-007-0250-5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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