Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Hum Mol Genet. 2004 Sep 1;13(17):1885-92. Epub 2004 Jun 30.

Single nucleotide polymorphisms in protein tyrosine phosphatase 1beta (PTPN1) are associated with essential hypertension and obesity.

Author information

1
Stanford Human Genome Center, Stanford University School of Medicine, CA, USA. molivier@mcw.edu

Erratum in

  • Hum Mol Genet. 2004 Oct 15;13(20):2545.

Abstract

Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1beta (PTP-1beta) is involved in the regulation of several important physiological pathways. It regulates both insulin and leptin signaling, and interacts with the epidermal- and platelet-derived growth factor receptors. The gene is located on human chromosome 20q13, and several rare single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been shown to be associated with insulin resistance and diabetes in different populations. As part of our ongoing investigations into the genetic basis of hypertension, we examined common sequence variants in the gene for association with hypertension, obesity and altered lipid profile in two populations of Japanese and Chinese descent. We re-sequenced all exons, selected intronic sequences and the promoter region in 24 individuals from our cohort. Fourteen SNPs were discovered, and six of these spanning 78 kb were genotyped in 1553 individuals from 672 families. All six SNPs were in linkage disequilibrium, and we found strong association of common risk haplotypes with hypertension in Chinese and Japanese (P<0.0001). In addition, individual SNPs showed association to total plasma cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol and VLDL-cholesterol levels, as well as obesity measures (body mass index). This analysis supports that PTP-1beta affects plasma lipid levels, and may lead to obesity and hypertension in Japanese and Chinese. Given similar associations found in other populations to insulin resistance and diabetes, this gene may play a crucial role in the development of the characteristic metabolic changes seen in patients with the metabolic syndrome.

PMID:
15229188
PMCID:
PMC2773501
DOI:
10.1093/hmg/ddh196
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Silverchair Information Systems Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center