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In Vitro Cell Dev Biol Anim. 2003 Nov-Dec;39(10):434-9.

Glucose transporter content and glucose uptake in skeletal muscle constructs engineered in vitro.

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1
Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2007, USA.

Abstract

Engineered muscle may eventually be used as a treatment option for patients suffering from loss of muscle function. The metabolic and contractile function of engineered muscle has not been well described; therefore, the purpose of this experiment was to study glucose transporter content and glucose uptake in engineered skeletal muscle constructs called myooids. Glucose uptake by way of 2-deoxyglucose and GLUT-1 and GLUT-4 transporter protein content was measured in basal and insulin-stimulated myooids that were engineered from soleus muscles of female Sprague-Dawley rats. There was a significant increase in the basal 2-deoxyglucose uptake of myooids compared with adult control (fivefold), contraction-stimulated (3.4-fold), and insulin-stimulated (threefold) soleus muscles (P = 0.0001, 0.0001, and 0.0001, respectively). In addition, there was a significant increase in the insulin-stimulated 2-deoxyglucose uptake of myooids compared with adult control soleus muscles in basal conditions (6.5-fold) and adult contraction-stimulated (4.5-fold) and insulin- stimulated (3.9-fold) soleus muscles (P = 0.0001, 0.0001, and 0.0001, respectively). There was a significant 30% increase in insulin-stimulated compared with basal 2-deoxyglucose uptake in the myooids. The myooid GLUT-1 protein content was 820% of the adult control soleus muscle, whereas the GLUT-4 protein content was 130% of the control soleus muscle. Myooid GLUT-1 protein content was 6.3-fold greater than GLUT-4 protein content, suggesting that the glucose transport of the engineered myooids is similar in several respects to that observed in both fetal and denervated skeletal muscle tissue.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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