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Mem Cognit. 2000 Sep;28(6):957-64.

Verbal coding in olfactory versus nonolfactory cognition.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, Brown University, Providence, RI 02912, USA. rachel_herz@brown.edu

Abstract

Two paired-associate memory experiments were conducted to investigate verbal coding in olfactory versus nonolfactory cognition. Experiment 1 examined the effects of switching/not switching odors and visual items to words between encoding and test sessions. Experiment 2 examined switching/not switching perceptual odors and verbal-imagine versions of odors with each other. Experiment 1 showed that memory was impaired for odors but not visual cues when they were switched to their verbal form at test. Experiment 2 revealed that memory was impaired for both odors and verbal-imagine cues when they were switched in format at test and that odor sensory imagery was not accessed by the instruction to imagine a smell. Together, these findings suggest that olfaction is distinguished from other sensory systems by the degree of verbal coding involved in associated cognitive processing.

PMID:
11105521
DOI:
10.3758/bf03209343
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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