Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Ann Thorac Surg. 1999 Jun;67(6):1990-3; discussion 1997-8.

Management of thoracic aortic graft infections.

Author information

1
Department of Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine, The Methodist Hospital, Houston, Texas, USA. jcoselli@bcm.tmc.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

We reviewed our experience managing patients with thoracic aortic graft infections to evaluate their clinical characteristics and outcomes of treatment.

METHODS:

Records of 20 consecutive patients with thoracic aortic graft infections managed over a 7 year period were retrospectively reviewed. Current follow-up status was obtained for all survivors. RESULTS; Nineteen patients (95%) underwent surgical treatment. Graft excision and in situ replacement were performed using Dacron grafts (10/19, 53%) or cryopreserved homografts (5/19, 26%). Three pseudoaneurysms were managed by debridement and primary repair. Although 30 day postoperative survival was 89% (17/19), in-hospital mortality occurred in 8 patients (42%). Infected thoracoabdominal aortic grafts were universally fatal. Of 6 patients with infected composite valve grafts, both patients who received new composite valve grafts died and all 4 who received homografts survived (p = 0.067).

CONCLUSIONS:

Infections involving thoracic aortic grafts continue to carry a high mortality rate, especially in patients with polymicrobial infections, thoracoabdominal aortic graft infections, and composite valve graft infections. Use of homografts in the latter situation may improve outcome.

PMID:
10391355
DOI:
10.1016/s0003-4975(99)00355-0
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center