Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Codas. 2018 Mar 1;30(1):e20170123. doi: 10.1590/2317-1782/20182017123.

Prevalence of communication, swallowing and orofacial myofunctional disorders in children and adolescents at the time of admission at a cancer hospital.

[Article in English, Portuguese; Abstract available in Portuguese from the publisher]

Author information

1
Setor de Fonoaudiologia, Instituto Nacional de Câncer José de Alencar Gomes da Silva - INCA - Rio de Janeiro (RJ), Brasil.
2
Programa de Pós-graduação em Clínica Médica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro - UFRJ - Rio de Janeiro (RJ), Brasil.
3
Programa de Carcinogênese Molecular, Instituto Nacional de Câncer José de Alencar Gomes da Silva - INCA - Rio de Janeiro (RJ), Brasil.
4
Serviço de Oncologia Pediátrica, Instituto Nacional de Câncer José de Alencar Gomes da Silva - INCA - Rio de Janeiro (RJ), Brasil.
5
Núcleo de Fonoaudiologia, Hospital Antônio Cândido de Camargo - A.C.Camargo - São Paulo (SP), Brasil.
6
Departamento de Pediatria, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro - UFRJ - Rio de Janeiro (RJ), Brasil.

Abstract

in English, Portuguese

PURPOSE:

Describe the prevalence of communication, swallowing and orofacial myofunctional disorders in a group of children and adolescents at the time of registration at a cancer hospital.

METHODS:

A cross-sectional study conducted with children aged ≥2 and adolescents, of both genders, admitted to the Pediatric Oncology Section of the Instituto Nacional de Câncer José de Alencar Gomes da Silva (INCA) from March 2014 to April 2015 for investigation and/or treatment of solid tumors. A protocol was used to record the sociodemographic and clinical information and findings of the speech-language pathology clinical evaluation, which included aspects of the oral sensorimotor system, swallowing, speech, language, voice, and hearing.

RESULTS:

Eighty-eight children/adolescents (41.3%) presented some type of speech-language disorder. The most frequent speech-language disorders were orofacial myofunctional disorder, dysphonia, and language impairments, whereas the less frequent ones were dysacusis, tongue paralysis, and trismus. Site of the lesion was the clinical variable that presented statistically significant correlation with presence of speech-language disorders.

CONCLUSION:

High prevalence of speech-language disorders was observed in children and adolescents at the time of admission at a cancer hospital. Occurrence of speech-language disorders was higher in participants with lesions in the central nervous system and in the head and neck region.

PMID:
29513872
DOI:
10.1590/2317-1782/20182017123
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Scientific Electronic Library Online
Loading ...
Support Center