Format

Send to

Choose Destination
PLoS Biol. 2019 Apr 9;17(4):e3000044. doi: 10.1371/journal.pbio.3000044. eCollection 2019 Apr.

Infection-generated electric field in gut epithelium drives bidirectional migration of macrophages.

Author information

1
Department of Dermatology, School of Medicine, University of California, Davis, Sacramento, California, United States of America.
2
Courant Institute and Department of Biology, New York University, New York, New York, United States of America.
3
Departamento de Biologia, Centro de Biologia Molecular e Ambiental (CBMA), Universidade do Minho, Braga, Portugal.
4
Skin and Cosmetic Research Department, Shanghai Skin Disease Hospital, Shanghai, China.
5
Department of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine, University of California, Davis, Davis, California, United States of America.
6
Department of Chemistry, University of California, Davis, Davis, California, United States of America.
7
Office of Research, School of Medicine, University of California, Davis, Davis, California, United States of America.

Abstract

Many bacterial pathogens hijack macrophages to egress from the port of entry to the lymphatic drainage and/or bloodstream, causing dissemination of life-threatening infections. However, the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. Here, we report that Salmonella infection generates directional electric fields (EFs) in the follicle-associated epithelium of mouse cecum. In vitro application of an EF, mimicking the infection-generated electric field (IGEF), induces directional migration of primary mouse macrophages to the anode, which is reversed to the cathode upon Salmonella infection. This infection-dependent directional switch is independent of the Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1) type III secretion system. The switch is accompanied by a reduction of sialic acids on glycosylated surface components during phagocytosis of bacteria, which is absent in macrophages challenged by microspheres. Moreover, enzymatic cleavage of terminally exposed sialic acids reduces macrophage surface negativity and severely impairs directional migration of macrophages in response to an EF. Based on these findings, we propose that macrophages are attracted to the site of infection by a combination of chemotaxis and galvanotaxis; after phagocytosis of bacteria, surface electrical properties of the macrophage change, and galvanotaxis directs the cells away from the site of infection.

PMID:
30964858
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pbio.3000044
Free full text

Conflict of interest statement

The authors have declared that no competing interests exist.

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Public Library of Science
Loading ...
Support Center