Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2019 May 1;104(5):1520-1574. doi: 10.1210/jc.2019-00198.

Treatment of Diabetes in Older Adults: An Endocrine Society* Clinical Practice Guideline.

Author information

1
Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York.
2
University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands.
3
Presence Saint Francis Hospital, Evanston, Illinois.
4
Presence Saint Joseph Hospital, Chicago, Illinois.
5
Complejo Hospitalario Universitario de Santiago, CIBER de Fisiopatologia Obesidad y Nutricion, Instituto Salud Carlos III, Santiago de Compostela, Spain.
6
University of Colorado Denver Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, Colorado.
7
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan.
8
National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore.
9
University of Washington Medical Center-Roosevelt, Seattle, Washington.
10
Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.
11
Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois.
12
Division of Preventive Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota.
13
King's College, London, United Kingdom.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The objective is to formulate clinical practice guidelines for the treatment of diabetes in older adults.

CONCLUSIONS:

Diabetes, particularly type 2, is becoming more prevalent in the general population, especially in individuals over the age of 65 years. The underlying pathophysiology of the disease in these patients is exacerbated by the direct effects of aging on metabolic regulation. Similarly, aging effects interact with diabetes to accelerate the progression of many common diabetes complications. Each section in this guideline covers all aspects of the etiology and available evidence, primarily from controlled trials, on therapeutic options and outcomes in this population. The goal is to give guidance to practicing health care providers that will benefit patients with diabetes (both type 1 and type 2), paying particular attention to avoiding unnecessary and/or harmful adverse effects.

PMID:
30903688
DOI:
10.1210/jc.2019-00198

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Silverchair Information Systems
Loading ...
Support Center