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JCO Clin Cancer Inform. 2018 Dec;2:1-10. doi: 10.1200/CCI.17.00152.

Feasibility of Wearable Physical Activity Monitors in Patients With Cancer.

Author information

1
Arjun Gupta, Nizar Bhulani, Ying Dong, Zain Rahimi, Kimberli Crane, Chad Rethorst, and Muhammad S. Beg, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX; and Tyler Stewart, Yale University, New Haven, CT.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The feasibility of using physical activity monitors (PAMs) to measure functional status in patients with cancer is unclear. We aimed to determine the feasibility of using PAMs to longitudinally assess physical activity and performance status (PS) in patients with cancer.

METHODS:

Patients with cancer who had Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) PS of 0 to 2 and were receiving systemic therapy were enrolled in a prospective pilot trial of PAM use. Feasibility was defined as patients using the PAM for > 50% of the observation period. We correlated PAM-reported measures with scores from ECOG PS and quality-of-life tools (Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General [FACT-G], Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptoms-Self-Rated 16 [QIDS-SR16], and Brief Fatigue Inventory [BFI]) using Pearson's correlation test. Patients were surveyed regarding their experience with PAMs at study completion.

RESULTS:

In all, 24 patients were enrolled; mean age was 54 years, 16 (67%) were women, and 19 (79%) were white. Twenty-three patients (96%) met the primary end point of feasibility. The median duration of follow-up was 69 days. Mean PAM-measured steps for ECOG PS of 0, 1, and 2 were 5,911, 1,890, and 845 steps per day, respectively ( P = .002). Minimum steps per day correlated with BFI ( r = -0.53; P < .01), FACT-G ( r = 0.45; P = .02), and QIDS-SR16 ( r = -0.57; P < .01). Eighteen patients (75%) reported a positive experience with the PAM.

CONCLUSION:

PAMs are a feasible tool for measuring long-term physical activity in patients with cancer who are receiving systemic therapy. PAM-derived measures correlated with clinician-assessed PS.

PMID:
30652571
DOI:
10.1200/CCI.17.00152
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