Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Clin Invest. 2019 Feb 4. pii: 122530. doi: 10.1172/JCI122530. [Epub ahead of print]

Immune synapses between mast cells and γδ T cells limit viral infection.

Author information

1
Program in Emerging Infectious Diseases, Duke-National University of Singapore (Duke-NUS) Medical School, Singapore.
2
Department of Pathology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, USA.
3
Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Young Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore.

Abstract

Mast cells (MCs) are immune sentinels, but whether they also function as antigen-presenting cells (APCs) remains elusive. Using mouse models of MC deficiency, we report on MC-dependent recruitment and activation of multiple T cell subsets to the skin and draining lymph nodes (DLNs) during dengue virus (DENV) infection. Newly recruited and locally proliferating γδ T cells were the first T cell subset to respond to MC-driven inflammation, and their production of IFN-γ was MC dependent. MC-γδ T cell conjugates were observed consistently in infected peripheral tissues, suggesting a new role for MCs as nonconventional APCs for γδ T cells. MC-dependent γδ T cell activation and proliferation during DENV infection required T cell receptor (TCR) signaling and the nonconventional antigen presentation molecule endothelial cell protein C receptor (EPCR) on MCs. γδ T cells, not previously implicated in DENV host defense, killed infected targeted DCs and contributed to the clearance of DENV in vivo. We believe immune synapse formation between MCs and γδ T cells is a novel mechanism to induce specific and protective immunity at sites of viral infection.

KEYWORDS:

Antigen presenting cells; Immunology; Infectious disease; Mast cells; T cells

PMID:
30561384
DOI:
10.1172/JCI122530
Free full text

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for American Society for Clinical Investigation
Loading ...
Support Center