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J Investig Med. 2019 Aug 19. pii: jim-2019-001007. doi: 10.1136/jim-2019-001007. [Epub ahead of print]

Traffic-related air pollutants increase the risk for age-related macular degeneration.

Chang KH1,2,3, Hsu PY4, Lin CJ5,6, Lin CL7, Juo SH3,4,8,9,10, Liang CL10,11,12,13.

Author information

1
Department of Medical Research, Tungs' Taichung Metroharbor Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan.
2
General Education Center, Jen-Teh Junior College of Medicine, Nursing and Management, Miaoli, Taiwan.
3
Graduate Institute of Biomedical Sciences, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan.
4
Department of Medical Research, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan.
5
Department of Ophthalmology, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung City, Taiwan.
6
School of Medicine, College of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan.
7
Management Office for Health Data, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan.
8
Institute of New Drug Development, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan.
9
Drug Development Center, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan.
10
Center for Myopia and Eye Disease, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan.
11
Department of Ophthalmology, Asia University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan.
12
Department of Optometry, College of Medical and Health Science, Asia University, Taichung, Taiwan.
13
Bright Eyes Clinic, Kaohsiung, Taiwan.

Abstract

The aim of this study was to investigate whether ambient nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and carbon monoxide (CO) increase the risk for age-related macular degeneration (AMD). This is a longitudinal population-based study using the data on Taiwan National Health Insurance Program between year 2000 and 2010. From the nationwide dataset, we enrolled subjects aged 50 or older and the annually total NO2 and CO exposure was calculated from 1998 to 2010 for each subject. The Cox proportional hazard regression was used to estimate the HRs with adjustment for other variables. A total of 39,819 AMD-free residents were enrolled, and 1442 participants developed AMD during the 11 -year follow-up. Compared with the lowest exposure quartile, the highest quartile of each air pollutant was associated with an increased risk for AMD. The adjusted HR was 1.91 (95% CI 1.64 to 2.23, p<0.001) for the highest NO2 quartile, and was 1.84 (95% CI 1.5 to 2.15, p<0.001) for the highest CO quartile. In this study, chronic exposure to the highest quartile of ambient NO2 or CO significantly increases the risk for AMD.

KEYWORDS:

age-related macular degeneration (AMD); carbon monoxide (CO); nitrogen dioxide (NO2); traffic-related pollutants

PMID:
31427389
DOI:
10.1136/jim-2019-001007

Conflict of interest statement

Competing interests: None declared.

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