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BMJ. 2018 Sep 4;362:k1497. doi: 10.1136/bmj.k1497.

Prevalence of diagnosed type 1 and type 2 diabetes among US adults in 2016 and 2017: population based study.

Xu G1, Liu B1, Sun Y1, Du Y1, Snetselaar LG1, Hu FB2,3,4, Bao W5,6,7.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology, College of Public Health, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242, USA.
2
Department of Nutrition, Harvard T H Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.
3
Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T H Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.
4
Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
5
Department of Epidemiology, College of Public Health, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242, USA wei-bao@uiowa.edu.
6
Obesity Research and Education Initiative, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA.
7
Fraternal Order of Eagles Diabetes Research Center, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To estimate the prevalence of diagnosed total diabetes, type 1 diabetes, and type 2 diabetes in the US general population and the proportions of each among US adults with a diagnosis of diabetes.

DESIGN:

Nationwide, population based, cross sectional survey.

SETTING:

National Health Interview Survey, 2016 and 2017.

PARTICIPANTS:

Adults aged 20 years or older (n=58 186), as a nationally representative sample of the civilian, non-institutionalized US population.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Prevalence of diagnosed diabetes, type 1 diabetes, and type 2 diabetes in the US general population, and the proportions of each subtype in participants with a diagnosis of diabetes.

RESULTS:

Among the 58 186 included adults, 6317 had received a diagnosis of diabetes. The weighted prevalence of diagnosed diabetes, type 1 diabetes, and type 2 diabetes among US adults was 9.7% (95% confidence interval 9.4% to 10.0%), 0.5% (0.5% to 0.6%), and 8.5% (8.2% to 8.8%), respectively. Type 1 diabetes was more prevalent among adults with lower education level, and type 2 diabetes was more prevalent among older adults, men, and those with lower educational level, lower family income level, and higher body mass index (BMI). Among adults with a diagnosis of diabetes, the weighted percentage of type 1 and type 2 diabetes was 5.6% (4.9% to 6.4%) and 91.2% (90.4% to 92.1%), respectively. The percentage of type 1 diabetes was higher among younger adults (age 20-44 years), non-Hispanic white people, those with higher education level, and those with lower BMI, whereas the percentage of type 2 diabetes was higher among older adults (age ≥65 years), non-Hispanic Asians, those with lower education level, and those with higher BMI.

CONCLUSION:

This study provided benchmark estimates on the national prevalence of diagnosed type 1 diabetes (0.5%) and type 2 diabetes (8.5%) among US adults. Among US adults with diagnosed diabetes, type 1 and type 2 diabetes accounted for 5.6% and 91.2%, respectively.

PMID:
30181166
PMCID:
PMC6122253
DOI:
10.1136/bmj.k1497
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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