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Science. 2019 Jun 28;364(6447):1275-1279. doi: 10.1126/science.aaw5868.

Color and orientation are jointly coded and spatially organized in primate primary visual cortex.

Author information

1
The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA.
2
Neurosciences Graduate Program, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA.
3
Medical Scientist Training Program, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA.
4
The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA. callaway@salk.edu.
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Contributed equally

Abstract

Previous studies support the textbook model that shape and color are extracted by distinct neurons in primate primary visual cortex (V1). However, rigorous testing of this model requires sampling a larger stimulus space than previously possible. We used stable GCaMP6f expression and two-photon calcium imaging to probe a very large spatial and chromatic visual stimulus space and map functional microarchitecture of thousands of neurons with single-cell resolution. Notable proportions of V1 neurons strongly preferred equiluminant color over achromatic stimuli and were also orientation selective, indicating that orientation and color in V1 are mutually processed by overlapping circuits. Single neurons could precisely and unambiguously code for both color and orientation. Further analyses revealed systematic spatial relationships between color tuning, orientation selectivity, and cytochrome oxidase histology.

PMID:
31249057
DOI:
10.1126/science.aaw5868

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