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Science. 2019 Feb 8;363(6427):607-610. doi: 10.1126/science.aav6618.

Impact of preexisting dengue immunity on Zika virus emergence in a dengue endemic region.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA.
2
Instituto da Saúde Coletiva, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Salvador, Bahia, Brazil.
3
Instituto Gonçalo Moniz, Fundação Oswaldo Cruz/MS, Salvador, Bahia, Brazil.
4
Department of Epidemiology of Microbial Diseases, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT, USA.
5
Department of Infectious Disease and Microbiology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.
6
Instituto Aggeu Magalhães, Fundação Oswaldo Cruz/MS, Recife, Pernambuco, Brazil.
7
Faculdade de Ciências Médicas, Universidade de Pernambuco, Recife, Pernambuco, Brazil.
8
Department of Fundamental Chemistry, Federal University of Pernambuco, Recife, PE 50740-540, Brazil.
9
Institute for Translational Science, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX, USA.
10
Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX, USA.
11
Department of Pathology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX, USA.
12
Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Salvador, Bahia, Brazil.
13
Sustainable Sciences Institute, Managua, Nicaragua.
14
Laboratorio Nacional de Virología, Centro Nacional de Diagnóstico y Referencia, Ministry of Health, Managua, Nicaragua.
15
Division of Infectious Diseases and Vaccinology, School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, CA, USA.
16
Faculdade de Medicina de São Jose do Rio Preto, São Jose do Rio Preto, São Paulo, Brazil.
17
Graduate School of Public Health, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.
18
Department of Biology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA. albert.ko@yale.edu datc@ufl.edu.
19
Emerging Pathogens Institute, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA.
20
Instituto Gonçalo Moniz, Fundação Oswaldo Cruz/MS, Salvador, Bahia, Brazil. albert.ko@yale.edu datc@ufl.edu.

Abstract

The clinical outcomes associated with Zika virus (ZIKV) in the Americas have been well documented, but other aspects of the pandemic, such as attack rates and risk factors, are poorly understood. We prospectively followed a cohort of 1453 urban residents in Salvador, Brazil, and, using an assay that measured immunoglobulin G3 (IgG3) responses against ZIKV NS1 antigen, we estimated that 73% of individuals were infected during the 2015 outbreak. Attack rates were spatially heterogeneous, varying by a factor of 3 within a community spanning 0.17 square kilometers. Preexisting high antibody titers to dengue virus were associated with reduced risk of ZIKV infection and symptoms. The landscape of ZIKV immunity that now exists may affect the risk for future transmission.

PMID:
30733412
DOI:
10.1126/science.aav6618

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