Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Science. 2019 Apr 12;364(6436). pii: eaau8650. doi: 10.1126/science.aau8650.

The NASA Twins Study: A multidimensional analysis of a year-long human spaceflight.

Author information

1
Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, NY, USA.
2
University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA, USA.
3
Center for Renal Precision Medicine, University of Texas Health, San Antonio, TX, USA.
4
University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA.
5
University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA.
6
Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, CA, USA.
7
KBRwyle, Houston, TX, USA.
8
Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, USA.
9
The Bin Talal Bin Abdulaziz Alsaud Institute for Computational Biomedicine, New York, NY, USA.
10
Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA.
11
University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA.
12
Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, USA.
13
University of California, Davis, Davis, CA, USA.
14
National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Houston, TX, USA.
15
Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.
16
University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany.
17
University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.
18
Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA.
19
MEI Technologies, Houston, TX, USA.
20
University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX, USA.
21
National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Houston, TX, USA. jbcharle@gmail.com craig.e.kundrot@nasa.gov graham_b_scott@yahoo.com susan.bailey@colostate.edu basner@pennmedicine.upenn.edu afeinberg@jhu.edu stuart.lee-1@nasa.gov chm2042@med.cornell.edu mignot@stanford.edu bkrana@ucsd.edu scott.m.smith@nasa.gov mpsnyder@stanford.edu fturek@northwestern.edu.
22
Space Life and Physical Sciences Division, NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC, USA. jbcharle@gmail.com craig.e.kundrot@nasa.gov graham_b_scott@yahoo.com susan.bailey@colostate.edu basner@pennmedicine.upenn.edu afeinberg@jhu.edu stuart.lee-1@nasa.gov chm2042@med.cornell.edu mignot@stanford.edu bkrana@ucsd.edu scott.m.smith@nasa.gov mpsnyder@stanford.edu fturek@northwestern.edu.
23
National Space Biomedical Research Institute, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA. jbcharle@gmail.com craig.e.kundrot@nasa.gov graham_b_scott@yahoo.com susan.bailey@colostate.edu basner@pennmedicine.upenn.edu afeinberg@jhu.edu stuart.lee-1@nasa.gov chm2042@med.cornell.edu mignot@stanford.edu bkrana@ucsd.edu scott.m.smith@nasa.gov mpsnyder@stanford.edu fturek@northwestern.edu.
24
Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, USA. jbcharle@gmail.com craig.e.kundrot@nasa.gov graham_b_scott@yahoo.com susan.bailey@colostate.edu basner@pennmedicine.upenn.edu afeinberg@jhu.edu stuart.lee-1@nasa.gov chm2042@med.cornell.edu mignot@stanford.edu bkrana@ucsd.edu scott.m.smith@nasa.gov mpsnyder@stanford.edu fturek@northwestern.edu.
25
University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA. jbcharle@gmail.com craig.e.kundrot@nasa.gov graham_b_scott@yahoo.com susan.bailey@colostate.edu basner@pennmedicine.upenn.edu afeinberg@jhu.edu stuart.lee-1@nasa.gov chm2042@med.cornell.edu mignot@stanford.edu bkrana@ucsd.edu scott.m.smith@nasa.gov mpsnyder@stanford.edu fturek@northwestern.edu.
26
Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA. jbcharle@gmail.com craig.e.kundrot@nasa.gov graham_b_scott@yahoo.com susan.bailey@colostate.edu basner@pennmedicine.upenn.edu afeinberg@jhu.edu stuart.lee-1@nasa.gov chm2042@med.cornell.edu mignot@stanford.edu bkrana@ucsd.edu scott.m.smith@nasa.gov mpsnyder@stanford.edu fturek@northwestern.edu.
27
KBRwyle, Houston, TX, USA. jbcharle@gmail.com craig.e.kundrot@nasa.gov graham_b_scott@yahoo.com susan.bailey@colostate.edu basner@pennmedicine.upenn.edu afeinberg@jhu.edu stuart.lee-1@nasa.gov chm2042@med.cornell.edu mignot@stanford.edu bkrana@ucsd.edu scott.m.smith@nasa.gov mpsnyder@stanford.edu fturek@northwestern.edu.
28
Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, NY, USA. jbcharle@gmail.com craig.e.kundrot@nasa.gov graham_b_scott@yahoo.com susan.bailey@colostate.edu basner@pennmedicine.upenn.edu afeinberg@jhu.edu stuart.lee-1@nasa.gov chm2042@med.cornell.edu mignot@stanford.edu bkrana@ucsd.edu scott.m.smith@nasa.gov mpsnyder@stanford.edu fturek@northwestern.edu.
29
The Feil Family Brain and Mind Research Institute, New York, NY, USA.
30
The WorldQuant Initiative for Quantitative Prediction, New York, NY, USA.
31
Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, CA, USA. jbcharle@gmail.com craig.e.kundrot@nasa.gov graham_b_scott@yahoo.com susan.bailey@colostate.edu basner@pennmedicine.upenn.edu afeinberg@jhu.edu stuart.lee-1@nasa.gov chm2042@med.cornell.edu mignot@stanford.edu bkrana@ucsd.edu scott.m.smith@nasa.gov mpsnyder@stanford.edu fturek@northwestern.edu.
32
University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA. jbcharle@gmail.com craig.e.kundrot@nasa.gov graham_b_scott@yahoo.com susan.bailey@colostate.edu basner@pennmedicine.upenn.edu afeinberg@jhu.edu stuart.lee-1@nasa.gov chm2042@med.cornell.edu mignot@stanford.edu bkrana@ucsd.edu scott.m.smith@nasa.gov mpsnyder@stanford.edu fturek@northwestern.edu.
33
Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, USA. jbcharle@gmail.com craig.e.kundrot@nasa.gov graham_b_scott@yahoo.com susan.bailey@colostate.edu basner@pennmedicine.upenn.edu afeinberg@jhu.edu stuart.lee-1@nasa.gov chm2042@med.cornell.edu mignot@stanford.edu bkrana@ucsd.edu scott.m.smith@nasa.gov mpsnyder@stanford.edu fturek@northwestern.edu.
#
Contributed equally

Abstract

To understand the health impact of long-duration spaceflight, one identical twin astronaut was monitored before, during, and after a 1-year mission onboard the International Space Station; his twin served as a genetically matched ground control. Longitudinal assessments identified spaceflight-specific changes, including decreased body mass, telomere elongation, genome instability, carotid artery distension and increased intima-media thickness, altered ocular structure, transcriptional and metabolic changes, DNA methylation changes in immune and oxidative stress-related pathways, gastrointestinal microbiota alterations, and some cognitive decline postflight. Although average telomere length, global gene expression, and microbiome changes returned to near preflight levels within 6 months after return to Earth, increased numbers of short telomeres were observed and expression of some genes was still disrupted. These multiomic, molecular, physiological, and behavioral datasets provide a valuable roadmap of the putative health risks for future human spaceflight.

Comment in

PMID:
30975860
DOI:
10.1126/science.aau8650

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for HighWire
Loading ...
Support Center