Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Science. 2019 Mar 1;363(6430). pii: eaau0780. doi: 10.1126/science.aau0780.

Binodal, wireless epidermal electronic systems with in-sensor analytics for neonatal intensive care.

Chung HU1,2, Kim BH1,3,4,5, Lee JY4,6, Lee J4, Xie Z3,7,8, Ibler EM9,10, Lee K1,3, Banks A1,4,5,11, Jeong JY4, Kim J3,12, Ogle C1,5, Grande D4,6, Yu Y4, Jang H4, Assem P6, Ryu D1,5, Kwak JW1,8, Namkoong M1,13, Park JB4, Lee Y4, Kim DH4, Ryu A4, Jeong J4, You K4, Ji B3,7,8,14, Liu Z15, Huo Q3,7,8, Feng X16, Deng Y7,17, Xu Y7,18, Jang KI19, Kim J20, Zhang Y16, Ghaffari R1,5,13, Rand CM10,21, Schau M22, Hamvas A21,22,23, Weese-Mayer DE10,21,23, Huang Y3,5,7,8, Lee SM24, Lee CH25, Shanbhag NR6, Paller AS26,9,23, Xu S27,5,9, Rogers JA27,3,4,5,8,13,28,29.

Author information

1
Simpson Querrey Institute, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL 60611, USA.
2
Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208, USA.
3
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208, USA.
4
Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA.
5
Center for Bio-integrated Electronics, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208, USA.
6
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA.
7
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208, USA.
8
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208, USA.
9
Department of Dermatology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL 60611, USA.
10
Center for Autonomic Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60611, USA.
11
Loomis Laboratory of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA.
12
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Kyung Hee University, Yongin 17104, Republic of Korea.
13
Department of Biomedical Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208, USA.
14
Department of Micro/Nano Electronics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240, China.
15
Institute of High Performance Computing, A*Star, 138632 Singapore.
16
Applied Mechanics Laboratory, Department of Engineering Mechanics, Center for Mechanics and Materials, Center for Flexible Electronics Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China.
17
State Key Laboratory of Mechanical System and Vibration, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240, China.
18
Key Laboratory of C&PC Structures of the Ministry of Education, Southeast University, Nanjing 2100096, China.
19
Department of Robotics Engineering, Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology (DGIST), Daegu 42988, Republic of Korea.
20
Department of Electronics Convergence Engineering, Kwangwoon University, Seoul 01897, Republic of Korea.
21
Stanley Manne Children's Research Institute, Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60611, USA.
22
Division of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60611, USA.
23
Department of Pediatrics, Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60611, USA.
24
Department of Energy Electronics Convergence, Kookmin University, Seoul 02707, Republic of Korea.
25
Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, School of Mechanical Engineering, Center for Implantable Devices, and Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907, USA.
26
Center for Bio-integrated Electronics, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208, USA. apaller@northwestern.edu stevexu@northwestern.edu jrogers@northwestern.edu.
27
Simpson Querrey Institute, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL 60611, USA. apaller@northwestern.edu stevexu@northwestern.edu jrogers@northwestern.edu.
28
Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208, USA.
29
Department of Neurological Surgery, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL 60611, USA.

Abstract

Existing vital sign monitoring systems in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) require multiple wires connected to rigid sensors with strongly adherent interfaces to the skin. We introduce a pair of ultrathin, soft, skin-like electronic devices whose coordinated, wireless operation reproduces the functionality of these traditional technologies but bypasses their intrinsic limitations. The enabling advances in engineering science include designs that support wireless, battery-free operation; real-time, in-sensor data analytics; time-synchronized, continuous data streaming; soft mechanics and gentle adhesive interfaces to the skin; and compatibility with visual inspection and with medical imaging techniques used in the NICU. Preliminary studies on neonates admitted to operating NICUs demonstrate performance comparable to the most advanced clinical-standard monitoring systems.

PMID:
30819934
DOI:
10.1126/science.aau0780

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for HighWire
Loading ...
Support Center