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Science. 2019 Mar 22;363(6433):1345-1349. doi: 10.1126/science.aat8515.

High-fructose corn syrup enhances intestinal tumor growth in mice.

Author information

1
Meyer Cancer Center, Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, NY 10065, USA.
2
Division of Endocrinology, Weill Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, NY 10065, USA.
3
Department of Pharmacology, Weill Cornell Medical College, 1300 York Avenue, New York, NY 10021, USA.
4
Division of Infectious Diseases, Weill Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, NY 10065, USA.
5
Tri-Institutional Training Program in Computational Biology and Medicine, Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, NY 10065, USA.
6
Institute for Pathology and Molecular Pathology, University Hospital Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.
7
Department of Oncological Sciences, Tisch Cancer Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY 10029, USA.
8
Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA.
9
Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10065, USA.
10
Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA.
11
Department of Oral Pathology, School of Dentistry, Chonnam National University, Gwangju, Republic of Korea.
12
Meyer Cancer Center, Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, NY 10065, USA. jihye.yun@bcm.edu lcantley@med.cornell.edu.
13
Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA. jihye.yun@bcm.edu lcantley@med.cornell.edu.

Abstract

Excessive consumption of beverages sweetened with high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) is associated with obesity and with an increased risk of colorectal cancer. Whether HFCS contributes directly to tumorigenesis is unclear. We investigated the effects of daily oral administration of HFCS in adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) mutant mice, which are predisposed to develop intestinal tumors. The HFCS-treated mice showed a substantial increase in tumor size and tumor grade in the absence of obesity and metabolic syndrome. HFCS increased the concentrations of fructose and glucose in the intestinal lumen and serum, respectively, and the tumors transported both sugars. Within the tumors, fructose was converted to fructose-1-phosphate, leading to activation of glycolysis and increased synthesis of fatty acids that support tumor growth. These mouse studies support the hypothesis that the combination of dietary glucose and fructose, even at a moderate dose, can enhance tumorigenesis.

PMID:
30898933
PMCID:
PMC6487857
[Available on 2020-03-22]
DOI:
10.1126/science.aat8515

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