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Science. 2018 Apr 20;360(6386):313-317. doi: 10.1126/science.aar2866.

Synaptic transmission from subplate neurons controls radial migration of neocortical neurons.

Author information

1
Neural Network Project, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, Tokyo 156-8506, Japan. maruyama-ck@igakuken.or.jp maeda-nb@igakuken.or.jp.
2
Anatomy and Cell Biology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Aichi 466-8550, Japan.
3
Center for Basic Technology Research, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, Tokyo 156-8506, Japan.
4
Neural Network Project, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, Tokyo 156-8506, Japan.
5
Department of Biology, Ochanomizu University, Tokyo 112-8610, Japan.
6
Graduate School of Humanities and Sciences, Ochanomizu University, Tokyo 112-8610, Japan.
7
School of Advanced Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Tokyo 169-0072, Japan.
8
Neural Development Project, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, Tokyo 156-8506, Japan.

Abstract

The neocortex exhibits a six-layered structure that is formed by radial migration of excitatory neurons, for which the multipolar-to-bipolar transition of immature migrating multipolar neurons is required. Here, we report that subplate neurons, one of the first neuron types born in the neocortex, manage the multipolar-to-bipolar transition of migrating neurons. By histochemical, imaging, and microarray analyses on the mouse embryonic cortex, we found that subplate neurons extend neurites toward the ventricular side of the subplate and form transient glutamatergic synapses on the multipolar neurons just below the subplate. NMDAR (N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor)-mediated synaptic transmission from subplate neurons to multipolar neurons induces the multipolar-to-bipolar transition, leading to a change in migration mode from slow multipolar migration to faster radial glial-guided locomotion. Our data suggested that transient synapses formed on early immature neurons regulate radial migration.

PMID:
29674592
DOI:
10.1126/science.aar2866
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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