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Liver Int. 2011 Sep;31(8):1179-90. doi: 10.1111/j.1478-3231.2011.02559.x. Epub 2011 Jun 14.

Cost effectiveness of screening immigrants for hepatitis B.

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  • 1Toronto Health Economics and Technology Assessment Collaborative, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada. william.wong@theta.utoronto.ca

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The prevalence of chronic hepatitis B (CHB) infection among the immigrants of North America ranges from 2 to 15%, among whom 40% develop advanced liver disease. Screening for hepatitis B surface antigen is not recommended for immigrants.

AIMS:

The objective of this study is to estimate the health and economic effects of screening strategies for CHB among immigrants.

METHODS:

We used the Markov model to examine the cost-effectiveness of three screening strategies: (i) 'No screening'; (ii) 'Screen and Treat' and (iii) 'Screen, Treat and Vaccinate' for 20-65 years old individuals who were born abroad but are currently living in Canada. Model data were obtained from the published literature. We measured predicted hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related deaths, costs (2008 Canadian Dollars), quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs), and incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER).

RESULTS:

Our results show that screening all immigrants will prevent 59 HBV-related deaths per 10, 000 persons screened over the lifetime of the cohort. Screening was associated with an increase in quality-adjusted life expectancy (0.024 QALYs) and cost ($1665) per person with an ICER of $69, 209/QALY gained compared with 'No screening'. The 'Screen, Treat and Vaccinate' costs an additional $81, generates an additional 0.000022 QALYs per person, with an ICER of $3, 648,123/QALY compared with the 'Screen and Treat'. Sensitivity analyses suggested that the 'Screen and Treat' is likely to be moderately cost-effective.

CONCLUSION:

We show that a selective hepatitis B screening programme targeted at all immigrants in Canada is likely to be moderately cost-effective. Identification of silent CHB infection with the offer of treatment when appropriate can extend the lives of immigrants at reasonable cost.

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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