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Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2018 May 15;115(20):5064-5071. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1801598115. Epub 2018 Apr 23.

Neuronal activity regulates neurotransmitter switching in the adult brain following light-induced stress.

Author information

1
Neurobiology Section, Division of Biological Sciences and Center for Neural Circuits and Behavior, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093-0357; meng.da@columbia.edu nspitzer@ucsd.edu.
2
Kavli Institute for Brain and Mind, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093-0357.
3
Neurobiology Section, Division of Biological Sciences and Center for Neural Circuits and Behavior, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093-0357.
4
Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305.
5
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305.
6
Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305.

Abstract

Neurotransmitter switching in the adult mammalian brain occurs following photoperiod-induced stress, but the mechanism of regulation is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that elevated activity of dopaminergic neurons in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PaVN) in the adult rat is required for the loss of dopamine expression after long-day photoperiod exposure. The transmitter switch occurs exclusively in PaVN dopaminergic neurons that coexpress vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (VGLUT2), is accompanied by a loss of dopamine type 2 receptors (D2Rs) on corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF) neurons, and can lead to increased release of CRF. Suppressing activity of all PaVN glutamatergic neurons decreases the number of inhibitory PaVN dopaminergic neurons, indicating homeostatic regulation of transmitter expression in the PaVN.

KEYWORDS:

dopaminergic neurons; paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus; stress response; transmitter coexpression; transmitter switching

PMID:
29686073
PMCID:
PMC5960321
DOI:
10.1073/pnas.1801598115
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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