Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2018 Jul 10;115(28):7428-7433. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1716489115. Epub 2018 Jun 25.

Tandem internal models execute motor learning in the cerebellum.

Author information

1
Motor Disorders Project, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, Setagaya-ku, 156-8506 Tokyo, Japan; takeru@brain.riken.jp masao@brain.riken.jp.
2
Department of Neurology and Neurological Science, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Bunkyo-ku, 113-8510 Tokyo, Japan.
3
Laboratory for Motor Learning Control, RIKEN Brain Science Institute, Wako, 351-0198 Saitama, Japan.
4
National Center Hospital, National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Kodaira, 187-8551 Tokyo, Japan.
5
Laboratory for Integrative Brain Function, Nozomi Hospital, Kitaadachi-gun, Saitama 362-0806, Japan.
6
Senior Advisor's Office, RIKEN Brain Science Institute, Wako, 351-0198 Saitama, Japan takeru@brain.riken.jp masao@brain.riken.jp.

Abstract

In performing skillful movement, humans use predictions from internal models formed by repetition learning. However, the computational organization of internal models in the brain remains unknown. Here, we demonstrate that a computational architecture employing a tandem configuration of forward and inverse internal models enables efficient motor learning in the cerebellum. The model predicted learning adaptations observed in hand-reaching experiments in humans wearing a prism lens and explained the kinetic components of these behavioral adaptations. The tandem system also predicted a form of subliminal motor learning that was experimentally validated after training intentional misses of hand targets. Patients with cerebellar degeneration disease showed behavioral impairments consistent with tandemly arranged internal models. These findings validate computational tandemization of internal models in motor control and its potential uses in more complex forms of learning and cognition.

KEYWORDS:

cerebellar degeneration; forward model; inverse model; motor control; prism adaptation

PMID:
29941578
PMCID:
PMC6048491
DOI:
10.1073/pnas.1716489115
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center