Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Sci Rep. 2019 Apr 9;9(1):5821. doi: 10.1038/s41598-019-42183-0.

Long-term benefit of Microbiota Transfer Therapy on autism symptoms and gut microbiota.

Author information

1
Biodesign Swette Center for Environmental Biotechnology, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, 85287, USA.
2
Biodesign Center for Fundamental and Applied Microbiomics, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, 85287, USA.
3
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH, 43606, USA.
4
School for Engineering of Matter, Transport and Energy, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, 85287, USA.
5
Integrative Developmental Pediatrics, Tucson, AZ, 85701, USA.
6
Center for Applied Microbiome Science, Pathogen and Microbiome Institute, Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, AZ, 86001, USA.
7
Department of Biological Sciences, Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, AZ, 86001, USA.
8
Biodesign Swette Center for Environmental Biotechnology, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, 85287, USA. dr.rosy@asu.edu.
9
Biodesign Center for Fundamental and Applied Microbiomics, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, 85287, USA. dr.rosy@asu.edu.
10
School of Sustainable Engineering and the Built Environment, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, 85287, USA. dr.rosy@asu.edu.

Abstract

Many studies have reported abnormal gut microbiota in individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD), suggesting a link between gut microbiome and autism-like behaviors. Modifying the gut microbiome is a potential route to improve gastrointestinal (GI) and behavioral symptoms in children with ASD, and fecal microbiota transplant could transform the dysbiotic gut microbiome toward a healthy one by delivering a large number of commensal microbes from a healthy donor. We previously performed an open-label trial of Microbiota Transfer Therapy (MTT) that combined antibiotics, a bowel cleanse, a stomach-acid suppressant, and fecal microbiota transplant, and observed significant improvements in GI symptoms, autism-related symptoms, and gut microbiota. Here, we report on a follow-up with the same 18 participants two years after treatment was completed. Notably, most improvements in GI symptoms were maintained, and autism-related symptoms improved even more after the end of treatment. Important changes in gut microbiota at the end of treatment remained at follow-up, including significant increases in bacterial diversity and relative abundances of Bifidobacteria and Prevotella. Our observations demonstrate the long-term safety and efficacy of MTT as a potential therapy to treat children with ASD who have GI problems, and warrant a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in the future.

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Nature Publishing Group Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center