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Nat Neurosci. 2018 Mar;21(3):324-328. doi: 10.1038/s41593-018-0074-8. Epub 2018 Feb 5.

Mrgprs on vagal sensory neurons contribute to bronchoconstriction and airway hyper-responsiveness.

Author information

1
The Solomon H. Snyder Department of Neuroscience, Center for Sensory Biology, School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA. liang.han@biology.gatech.edu.
2
School of Biological Sciences, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA, USA. liang.han@biology.gatech.edu.
3
The Solomon H. Snyder Department of Neuroscience, Center for Sensory Biology, School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA.
4
Department of Medicine, Division of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA.
5
W. Harry Feinstone Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA.
6
School of Biological Sciences, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA, USA.
7
Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA.
8
The Solomon H. Snyder Department of Neuroscience, Center for Sensory Biology, School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA. xdong2@jhmi.edu.
9
Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA. xdong2@jhmi.edu.

Abstract

Asthma, accompanied by lung inflammation, bronchoconstriction and airway hyper-responsiveness, is a significant public health burden. Here we report that Mas-related G protein-coupled receptors (Mrgprs) are expressed in a subset of vagal sensory neurons innervating the airway and mediates cholinergic bronchoconstriction and airway hyper-responsiveness. These findings provide insights into the neural mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of asthma.

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