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Nat Methods. 2019 Jun;16(6):526-532. doi: 10.1038/s41592-019-0421-z. Epub 2019 May 13.

Bioluminescent-based imaging and quantification of glucose uptake in vivo.

Author information

1
Institute of Chemical Sciences and Engineering (ISIC), Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL), Lausanne, Switzerland.
2
Jožef Stefan Institute, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
3
Nestlé Institute of Health Sciences SA, EPFL Innovation Park, Bâtiments G/H, Lausanne, Switzerland.
4
Department of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
5
Institute of Chemical Sciences and Engineering (ISIC), Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL), Lausanne, Switzerland. elena.goun@epfl.ch.

Abstract

Glucose is a major source of energy for most living organisms, and its aberrant uptake is linked to many pathological conditions. However, our understanding of disease-associated glucose flux is limited owing to the lack of robust tools. To date, positron-emission tomography imaging remains the gold standard for measuring glucose uptake, and no optical tools exist for non-invasive longitudinal imaging of this important metabolite in in vivo settings. Here, we report the development of a bioluminescent glucose-uptake probe for real-time, non-invasive longitudinal imaging of glucose absorption both in vitro and in vivo. In addition, we demonstrate that the sensitivity of our method is comparable with that of commonly used 18F-FDG-positron-emission-tomography tracers and validate the bioluminescent glucose-uptake probe as a tool for the identification of new glucose transport inhibitors. The new imaging reagent enables a wide range of applications in the fields of metabolism and drug development.

PMID:
31086341
PMCID:
PMC6546603
[Available on 2019-11-13]
DOI:
10.1038/s41592-019-0421-z

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