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Nat Methods. 2018 Jun;15(6):429-432. doi: 10.1038/s41592-018-0008-0. Epub 2018 May 7.

High-speed volumetric imaging of neuronal activity in freely moving rodents.

Author information

1
Laboratory of Neurotechnology and Biophysics, The Rockefeller University, New York, NY, USA.
2
Research Institute of Molecular Pathology, Vienna, Austria.
3
Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, USA.
4
Center for Brain Science, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, USA.
5
Department of Neurology, Integrative Center for Learning and Memory, Brain Research Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
6
Department of Psychiatry & Biobehavioral Sciences, Integrative Center for Learning and Memory, Brain Research Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
7
West Los Angeles Virginia Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
8
Laboratory of Neurotechnology and Biophysics, The Rockefeller University, New York, NY, USA. vaziri@rockefeller.edu.
9
Research Institute of Molecular Pathology, Vienna, Austria. vaziri@rockefeller.edu.
10
The Kavli Neural Systems Institute, The Rockefeller University, New York, NY, USA. vaziri@rockefeller.edu.

Abstract

Thus far, optical recording of neuronal activity in freely behaving animals has been limited to a thin axial range. We present a head-mounted miniaturized light-field microscope (MiniLFM) capable of capturing neuronal network activity within a volume of 700 × 600 × 360 µm3 at 16 Hz in the hippocampus of freely moving mice. We demonstrate that neurons separated by as little as ~15 µm and at depths up to 360 µm can be discriminated.

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PMID:
29736000
DOI:
10.1038/s41592-018-0008-0

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