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Nat Commun. 2018 Dec 17;9(1):5349. doi: 10.1038/s41467-018-07764-z.

Effective weight control via an implanted self-powered vagus nerve stimulation device.

Author information

1
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, 53706, USA.
2
State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin films and Integrated Devices, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu, Sichuan, 610054, People's Republic of China.
3
Department of Radiology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, 53705, USA.
4
Department of Nuclear Medicine, Peking University First Hospital, Beijing, 100034, People's Republic of China.
5
University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center, Madison, WI, 53705, USA.
6
Department of Radiology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, 53705, USA. wcai@uwhealth.org.
7
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, 53706, USA. xudong.wang@wisc.edu.

Abstract

In vivo vagus nerve stimulation holds great promise in regulating food intake for obesity treatment. Here we present an implanted vagus nerve stimulation system that is battery-free and spontaneously responsive to stomach movement. The vagus nerve stimulation system comprises a flexible and biocompatible nanogenerator that is attached on the surface of stomach. It generates biphasic electric pulses in responsive to the peristalsis of stomach. The electric signals generated by this device can stimulate the vagal afferent fibers to reduce food intake and achieve weight control. This strategy is successfully demonstrated on rat models. Within 100 days, the average body weight is controlled at 350 g, 38% less than the control groups. This work correlates nerve stimulation with targeted organ functionality through a smart, self-responsive system, and demonstrated highly effective weight control. This work also provides a concept in therapeutic technology using artificial nerve signal generated from coordinated body activities.

PMID:
30559435
PMCID:
PMC6297229
DOI:
10.1038/s41467-018-07764-z
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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