Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Nat Commun. 2018 Mar 12;9(1):1037. doi: 10.1038/s41467-018-03439-x.

Label-free analysis of physiological hyaluronan size distribution with a solid-state nanopore sensor.

Author information

1
Virginia Tech-Wake Forest University School of Biomedical Engineering and Sciences, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, 27101, USA.
2
Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, 14853, USA.
3
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma, OK, 73104, USA.
4
Institute for Regenerative Medicine, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, 27101, USA.
5
Comprehensive Cancer Center, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, 27157, USA.
6
Virginia Tech-Wake Forest University School of Biomedical Engineering and Sciences, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, 27101, USA. erahbar@wakehealth.edu.
7
Virginia Tech-Wake Forest University School of Biomedical Engineering and Sciences, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, 27101, USA. arhall@wakehealth.edu.
8
Institute for Regenerative Medicine, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, 27101, USA. arhall@wakehealth.edu.
9
Comprehensive Cancer Center, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, 27157, USA. arhall@wakehealth.edu.

Abstract

Hyaluronan (or hyaluronic acid, HA) is a ubiquitous molecule that plays critical roles in numerous physiological functions in vivo, including tissue hydration, inflammation, and joint lubrication. Both the abundance and size distribution of HA in biological fluids are recognized as robust indicators of various pathologies and disease progressions. However, such analyses remain challenging because conventional methods are not sufficiently sensitive, have limited dynamic range, and/or are only semi-quantitative. Here we demonstrate label-free detection and molecular weight discrimination of HA with a solid-state nanopore sensor. We first employ synthetic HA polymers to validate the measurement approach and then use the platform to determine the size distribution of as little as 10 ng of HA extracted directly from synovial fluid in an equine model of osteoarthritis. Our results establish a quantitative method for assessment of a significant molecular biomarker that bridges a gap in the current state of the art.

PMID:
29531292
PMCID:
PMC5847568
DOI:
10.1038/s41467-018-03439-x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Nature Publishing Group Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center